Exchange

Delivery Reports for your email messages in Exchange 2010

Have you ever gotten a ticket requesting if a particular email sent was delivered ? Or did our trusty Administrative assistant need to make sure that everyone received the latest company memo she just sent?

Well, with Exchange 2010, mailbox users can now do their own delivery reports.  Since we’ve upgraded to Exchange 2010 I refer all my users with  tracking requests to use the new Delivery reports available for them in OWA. The Delivery Reports can be used to search and get delivery information about messages sent by you or sent to you. If you sent a message to five people, for example, you can check the status of the delivery of that message to each person. Delivery reports is only available in OWA and is not accessible using any version of the outlook client. Once a result is viewed a users has the option to send the report to any email address of they choose.

Another added bonus with this feature, it even tracks the message once it’s in the mailbox. For example, User A indicated that she sent an email to User B and User C, but only User B said he received the email. User C insisted they never received the email and there must be an issue with our Exchange servers. I assured them there was nothing wrong with the mail servers and there had to be a valid explanation as to why he was not receiving the email. I walked User A through on how to run a Delivery report on her email messages she sent to User B and User C. The results of her search not only confirmed that BOTH User B and User C received her email but it also showed that User C had moved the email to the deleted items folder. OH Snap!

How to run a Delivery Report:

  1. To access Delivery reports you or the User must login to your Exchange 2010 OWA site with your required credentials
  2. Click Options
  3. See All Options > Organize E-Mail
  4.  Delivery Reports
    • You can search for reports on messages you’ve sent by using the Search for messages I’ve sent to box.
    • You can use the Search for messages I’ve received from box to search for delivery information about messages someone has sent to you.
  5. Once required fields are filled in and the results are found, you can double-click on a result to see more details.

Delivery reports are a nice added feature made available to users with Exchange 2010. I personally think that this is way better than sending those awful read receipts for internal emails,  which generate even more unneeded traffic.

Have a great night!- Until next time.

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Performing Mailbox exports in Exchange 2010

This post is dedicated to a few of our techs that will stay nameless to protect the innocent (or guilty) because it seems that they forget how to export mailboxes when they get a request to do one. Don’t worry, I still love you guys and I totally understand on forgetting how to do something if you don’t do it everyday. Repetition is key and when you don’t export mailboxes everyday it’s easy to forget.

So the next time you guys come to me and ask “Can I export a mailbox and if so, how do I do that?”  , I will simply refer you to this post.  I’m only going to post 2 of most commonly requested cmdlets, but for more detailed information on Managing Mailbox Import and Export Requests on Exchange 2010 visit Microsoft’s Technet here.

Prerequisites:

  •  Mailbox exports can only be performed using EMS ( Exchange Management Shell), they cannot be exported using the EMC
  • To be able to export a mailbox one must have the  Mailbox Import Export management role assigned to them or be added to the built-in Discovery Management Role Group in Exchange 2010.
  • You need to create a network shared folder to place the exports
  • The account running the export should have appropriate permissions to access to the network share to view the files when completed.
  • The Exchange Trusted Subsystem group should be granted read/write permission on the network share. Please note:  If you don’t grant this permission, you’ll receive an error message stating that Exchange is unable to establish a connection to the target mailbox.

Exporting Mailboxes

  • Log onto a system that has EMS installed
  • Type the following cmdlets or you can copy and paste directly from this post.

To export the whole  mailbox:

New-MailboxExportRequest  “mailbox alias”  -FilePath  “\\filepathfor yourexport\nameofpst.pst”

To export data from the well-known folders in a mailbox. The list of well-known folders can be found on the Technet site

New-MailboxExportRequest  “mailbox alias”  -IncludeFolders “#Inbox#” -FilePath  “\\filepathfor yourexport\nameofpst.pst”

The export will take some time to complete – this all depends on how big the mailbox is. Once complete go to the mailbox export network share and copy the pst to any location you want to store it at.

After the export is completed you will need to do some clean up to remove the export request because it is not automatically cleared.

Removing the Export Request

  • Type the following cmdlet or you can copy and paste directly from this post.

Remove-MailboxExportRequest -identity “user\mailboxexport”

And there you have it! Mailbox exports aren’t painful at all. Like with any powershell cmdlets you can copy these cmdlets and save to a text file. When you need it again just simply modify the names then do a copy and paste directly to EMS.

How to set an Out of Office Message in Powershell

Something that I get asked quite often from our techs is  “can I set Userxx’s Out of Office message?”. Luckily with Exchange 2010, any tech or admin with the correct permissions can easily do that. There are 2 ways ; via the Exchange Control Panel( ECP) or through Powershell. I personally think it’s easier to do it through the shell but the ECP has it advantages too. For instance the ECP can be accessed on any web browser and if you’re configured correctly you can even access it outside of your internal company network.

If you’re like me and you like quick & easy then using Powershell maybe the method for you. To set the OOF using Powershell run the following commands.

Set-MailboxAutoReplyConfiguration pschmitt@youremail.com –AutoReplyState Scheduled –StartTime “1/8/2013” –EndTime “1/15/2013” –ExternalMessage “Type External OOF message here” –InternalMessage “Type Internal OOF message here

You can save this command in a text file and next time you need to set the OOF simply modify the email address and message then copy & paste directly in powershell.

Now wasn’t that simple?